PhD Candidates from University of Agder reflect on Gipuzkoa Sarean

PhD Candidates from University of Agder reflect on Gipuzkoa Sarean


Methods in Participatory and Interactive Research.
May 23rd-27th, 2016. San Sebastian. Considering what you learned in Norway and what you have seen here about Gipuzkoa Sarean, what would you underline? Going back one year ago, when I first
heard about the meeting or the projects, I was really fascinated because my
background is a civil servants. And I’ve been working with regional development and regional industrial development for 15 years. So coming here as a PhD student, actually, attending a meeting where the interaction between policy makers and action researchers happens wa’s a good experience. First I would say that it’s been great to see the project here, because learning about it in Norway was a more abstract than feeling because you knew they were doing something with territorial development, but we didn’t know the region and you can’t really place the ideas. I think one of the main lessons learned is how to make the conflict explicit because we have a similar project in Norway, not with an action researcher but we are trying to make the collaborative environment between the researchers and the county better and I can see that there’s some underlying conflicts which nobody actually explicitly states in some way. So that would be my main lesson: that the honesty, the trust they have in actually making explicit both the expectations from both sides And I would also emphasize the respect the two environments have for each other in terms of knowledge, in terms of developments and that they in some way find the common ground for moving together in the same direction. I felt that it was very obvious that they really wanted to work together and I also see that the long-term perspective that this project has is of great importance and the role of Miren and you and the team that’s been following the changes in the government also has an extremely great value. It would be great to try something similar in Norway. I think that the gaps between institutions in Norway are greater. And also when it comes to the respect for scientific knowledge having a role to play in a more like stated ordinary life where you have something to deliver every day.

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